Tadiran Telecom Blog

Say Goodbye to Legacy UC Infrastructure

Written by Mike Long - February 15, 2015

As time passes, it seems as though we’ll be facing a generational paradigm shift. Having grown up with access to cutting-edge technology, millennials—typically those born between 1980 and 2000—expect a seamless experience as they migrate across devices. And these expectations need to be integrated into the workplace.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, millennials will make up the majority of the workforce by 2015. By 2030, they’ll represent three-quarters of it. These workers have essentially used cell phones, instant messaging and text messaging since each of the communicative technologies were brand new.

These things taken together spell out the need for UC clients to grab all texts, instant messages, emails and voicemails and display them in one central location, both on the monitor and on the mobile device.

After all, devices are getting smarter, and the workforce is now coming in with more of an innate understanding of how to gain the most utility from them. As a result, UC vendors have an opportunity to develop functionality that is embraced by both the employer and the employee. While the former will enjoy the new solution’s enhancement of productivity, the latter will enjoy the freedom, in a very mobile sense, that the technology provides.

Say Goodbye to Legacy Infrastructure

To truly embrace mobility, however, businesses have no choice but to shed their legacy infrastructure, despite the fact that workers might be extremely comfortable with these familiar tools.

Nevertheless, business leaders are going to have to embrace change if they want their brands to remain relevant. Younger employees expect modern communications tools, and they expect to have the ability to work flexibly—whether that’s staying home with their sick kid, working on a story from the DMV or working from a café just to switch things up. Should a business remain stubborn and fail to recognize this axiom, it risks losing employees to companies that give them the tools they need to succeed.

The trick for UC vendors, then, is to be able to help organizations large and small to successfully migrate to modern solutions with as few hiccups as possible, if any—which is precisely where mobility comes into play. There will certainly be some lag in this collective migration, but the sooner businesses understand that such a change is inevitable, the better position they’ll be in to remain economically viable over the long term.